If you just said something I didn’t hear what it was?

Rebecca
Rebecca
8 Min Read
If you just said something I didn't hear what it was

If you just said something I didn’t hear what it was? Manners of expressing what you didn’t hear or understand

If you just said something I didn’t hear what it was? Imagine you’re in the middle of a conversation in a foreign language and you’re completely baffled by what someone has just said to you. So, what do you do now? Instead of a nicer, more rational response, I frequently find myself blurting out something little nasty like “What?” or “Huh?”

When you can’t hear or understand someone, it’s acceptable to use expressions like “Huh?” or “What?” in English, German, or Spanish in highly informal discourse, such as with close friends, but in most circumstances, you should communicate in a more courteous manner.

Below are several expressions in English, German, and Spanish that you can use when you don’t understand or can’t hear something.

I propose visualizing yourself in these situations and repeating these sentences aloud frequently so that they will come to you instinctively when the phone service is poor or you miss a question in a noisy conversation.

You can simply ask the other person to repeat what they said using these phrases: Sorry, I didn’t understand. Could you repeat that please?
Sorry, I didn’t notice. Could you just repeat that a little louder?

You can say: I can’t hear you very well if the sound on the phone is unclear or the person you’re talking to is speaking too low. Could you kindly speak up?

If you don’t understand a word, you can ask the other person to clarify it to you: I’m not familiar with that term; could you kindly explain what it means?

If you’ve previously asked them to repeat yourself and you still don’t understand, you might express your regret in one of the following ways:
Please accept my apologies; English is not my native language. Could you please repeat that for me?
Please accept my apologies for my poor command of the English language. Could you perhaps talk a little more slowly?

What do you say if you don’t understand what someone is saying in English?

If you just said something I didn’t hear what it was? However, it is when your knowledge is eventually put into practice — not just in the classroom, but in real life – that it becomes most valuable. Someone is there to listen, support, test, and guide your learning in the classroom, whether it’s online or at a school.

But, if you’re out in the world and practicing your English, how can you be sure you understand what’s going on? As we begin to put our newly acquired language abilities to use, we often notice that the way words sound in speech differs significantly from how we studied them. Accents, pace, slang, and idiomatic differences might make us feel completely befuddled as if the other person isn’t speaking English at all.

Here’s EF English Live’s list of useful phrases and words to use when you’re not sure what someone is saying…

Formal: If you just said something I didn’t hear what it was?

These brief phrases are polite ways of expressing that you didn’t hear or understand something spoken in English.

  • Sorry?
  • Please excuse me.
  • Pardon?
  • Please accept my apologies.

[This is a formal expression that is now largely used]

Formal sentences that are longer: If you just said something I didn’t hear what it was?

These sentences will come in handy if you don’t understand something you’ve heard.

  • Sorry, but I’m afraid I don’t understand what you’re saying.
  • Could you please repeat the question?
  • I’m sorry, but I’m not sure what you’re talking about. Could you repeat it?
  • I’m sorry, but I missed that. Could you perhaps talk a little more slowly?
  • I’m perplexed. Could you just explain it to me once more?
  • I’m sorry, but I didn’t get it. Could you just repeat that a little louder?
  • I’m sorry, but I didn’t hear you. Could you just tell me again?

Informal: If you just said something I didn’t hear what it was?

These are more frequent, casual, conversational methods to ask someone to repeat themselves or to express your confusion. Some are more casual (and so impolite!) than others.

  • Sorry? – very beneficial when you haven’t heard anything.
  • What do you mean, sorry? – handy when you don’t know what sound you heard
  • A little more relaxed (can be rude)
  • ‘Excuse me,’ I say. – a more informal form of ‘pardon me’
  • Huh? – a sound rather than a word; It’s important to be careful how you use it, as it’s more usually connected with ‘I don’t get it’ or ‘I don’t comprehend’ than ‘I can’t hear you.’
  • What? – this can come out as hostile at times, so be cautious!
  • Eh? – a sound used to indicate that someone is difficult to hear or understand.
  • Hmm? – a sound made when you’re a little more distracted or not paying attention.

Read more: Harry Potter’s owl name – What is Harry Potter’s owl’s name?

Slang: If you just said something I didn’t hear what it was?

  • Do you want to come back?
  • What do you mean? – This is a characteristic of American English.
  • Is it okay if you pass that by me once more?
  • What do you mean? – In the United Kingdom, this is more prevalent.
  • I’m not sure what you’re talking about… ‘I don’t understand’ is a statement rather than a question.

Idioms: If you just said something I didn’t hear what it was?

Idioms are phrases that are unique to the language in which they were created. Here are three that you could use if you wanted to explain something that sounded complicated, unclear, or difficult to comprehend in a more creative way.

  • I’m completely perplexed by what you’re saying.
  • To me, it’s all Greek.
  • Sorry, but this is all muck to me.

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Rebecca is an Independent content writer for breldigital, She writes content on any given topic. She loves to write a case study article or reviews on a brand, Be it any topic, she nails it
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