DNS, how does it work?

To begin with, you should know that each website has a so-called “IP” address, for example: 192.168.0.1. It is in fact the real address of the site, that of its server.

The DNS are “System of server names” or “Name server System” in the language of molière, that is to say they will allow to translate the web address of a site that you will type in the search bar (or “URL”), in IP address. To do this, they will use an index (or database) linking each IP with the right site .

For example, the URL of our site is www.generationcloud.fr, its ip address 100.101.102.103. Instead of typing this series of numbers, we type the name of the site in the search bar, thanks to the DNS .

Basically, this is what happens when you type in a URL, or click on a link to a URL:

  1. The browser contacts the DNS server with the address in alphanumeric writing (for example www.generationcoud.fr).
  2. The DNS server searches its index for which IP address corresponds to this alphanumeric URL.
  3. It then shares the IP address with the browser. The browser directs you to the corresponding site.

If this server is no longer functioning , then you will no longer be able to use Google search , which works with URLs and not IP addresses, nor to join your favorite sites with their public names.

Suddenly, it can happen that some software works on the internet despite your inability to do any research.

A cause for every DNS error

SFR, Free, Bouygues and Orange : all in the same boat. By default, your computer will use the DNS IP addresses of your operator. It often happens, especially at SFR, that these DNS are temporarily defective. As a result, viewing a website is not possible, although your telephony and TV services are working.

Contacting your internet operator will not change anything, you will already be in luck if customer service can figure out the internet connection problem you are having.

 

 

 

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